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Making any sort of impact through music requires an insane amount of work, as well as dedication, commitment, and inward-looking. From learning an instrument and writing songs to recording albums, booking shows, and embarking on tours, nothing good in music ever happens without a work ethic. Sure, there are times when inspiration for a song appears out of nowhere without effort or planning, but most momentum in music is generated by tedious non-musical work: writing emails, sticking to a regular rehearsal schedule, setting time aside each day to write music and play your instrument.

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few select testimonials of Soundfly’s Beginner Harmonic Theory course directly from our students.

Ethan Hein is a Doctoral Fellow in Music Education at New York University. He teaches music technology, production and education at NYU and Montclair State University. With the NYU Music Experience Design Lab, Ethan has taken a leadership role in the creation of new technologies for learning and expression, most notably the Groove Pizza. He is the instructor of the free Soundfly course series called Theory for Producers. He maintains a widely-followed and influential blog, and has written for various publications, including Slate, Quartz, and NewMusicBox.

Grants for music education 2019

ASCAP has a handy list posted on their site describing the many ways and sources they collect royalty revenue from. It includes major American TV networks, commercial and internet radio, and thousands of public spaces like bars, restaurants and shopping malls.

Songtrust does offer pipeline advances, on a case-by-case basis. If you’d like to request a royalty advance consultation, submit a request here. Note this is not a publishing advance, but instead an advance on royalties in your account. Click here to register for Songtrust, and use promo code STSoundfly for 10% off!

Let’s say C major is our parent scale, containing the notes: C, D, E, F, G, A, and B. There are six other diatonic modes we can tap into by playing this same collection of notes, but starting on notes other than C.

It absolutely could make “lazy” DJs better selectors, however, that is not our focus. We want to help people become better listeners and help them identify and understand the music they actually love, so they can confidently find more of it.

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

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But while all that extra time and opportunity can certainly help musicians learn to home record, produce, and mix, it might set us off with some bad time management habits if we’re not careful. Sometimes having too much time, or too much choice in terms of what instruments or sounds to use can debilitate our focus and our sense of making the most out of our studio hours. There is such a thing as too much of a good thing.

I would describe Capsule as sort of a Japanease version of France’s Justice. Producer Yasutaka Nakata provides the hard-hitting techno beats and Toshiko Koshijima sings those catchy, auto-tuned vocals. Their music is often licensed by Japanese TV shows so there is a chance that you’ve heard some of their songs as themes floating around. Plus, they released their fifteenth album (!) Wave Runner in 2015, so they’ve been on the scene for a minute. While their influences are varied, they use bossa beats, British acid house bass lines, and a variety of other notable source styles, but it would be difficult to describe their music as anything but simply their own.

“I Wanna Dance With Somebody” uses the first, third, and fifth notes on that scale more often in the chorus than in the verses and pre-choruses. Since Cui and Dr. Hughes have each worked on different versions of an experiment about how notes 1, 3, and 5 on a scale affect us psychologically, they can tell us a lot about why that difference matters through the lenses of music theory, music psychology, and cognitive psychology alike.

Carter Lee is a bassist/educator/producer. He is originally from Edmonton, Canada and now resides in Brooklyn, NY. In addition to leading the hip-hop group, Tiger Speak, Lee is the music director for the bands of both Shea Rose and Moruf. He is also a sideman for countless other artists. Carter brings his wealth of experience in many different musical situations to the Soundfly team and is eager to help any musician who is hoping to better their band. Check out his course Building a Better Band on Soundfly today!

Touring is great. But it can very quickly turn into exhaustive, monotonous work. Here are 10 great tips to keep things interesting and fun on the road.